foodsnobblog

Søllerød Kro, Copenhagen

Søllerød is a village on the northern cusp of Copenhagen. Although small, it boasts a serious history. Its medieval church dates back to 1100 AD whilst a number of its eighteenth and nineteenth century country-houses can claim to have once lodged illustrious local and international artists and poets alike – including the country’s most-loved, Hans […]

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Fäviken Magasinet, Järpen

‘Is it right that I force my customers to kill a chicken at their table before I cook it for their dinner?’ This was how Magnus Nilsson, flushed with excitement, accosted me one afternoon during February’s Omnivore food festival in Deauville. ‘A couple of Russian ladies just asked me this during an interview,’ he gushed. […]

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Victor’s Gourmet-Restaurant Schloss Berg, Perl-Nennig

In one of Germany’s most westerly corners, where France, Luxembourg and the federal republic collide, resides a Renaissance castle amidst the Mosel vineyards. Dating back originally to the twelfth century, Schloss berg in little Nennig, a village literally leaning against Luxembourg’s border, is more schloß than it is berg – the latter generally being medieval, […]

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la Grenouillère, la Madelaine-sous-Montreuil

March 1979 proved a prolific month for Roland Gauthier – within ten days he had acquired not just a restaurant, but a son too. Gauthier junior was born in Boulogne-sur-Mer into a Jura family who found themselves in the Pas-de-Calais after his father became chef de cuisine at the Château de Montreuil. By taking over […]

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Vendôme, Bergisch Gladbach

Vendôme is the capital of Loir-et-Cher in northwest France. In the sixteenth century, the encompassing county was made a duchy and bestowed upon César, the illegitimate son of then king, Henri IV. César – thus the duc de Vendôme – had his private residence in Paris, at what has become the Place Vendôme. To discover […]

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Restaurant Paustian v. Bo Bech, Copenhagen

Almost all are aware of the Sydney Opera House, but nearly none know the name of the man whose vision it was. He was Jørn Oberg Utzon. Even though a masterpiece – although arguably the most famous monument in the southern hemisphere – its construction and the near scandal that surrounded it, resulted in Utzon’s […]

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Oud Sluis, Sluis

  Some might be surprised to read that over four hundred years ago, the southern provinces of the Netherlands, along with all Belgium and Luxembourg, were under Spanish rule for nigh onto a century and a half. Indeed, although not a historic amount of time, it was long enough to leave a mark on the […]

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Pierre Gagnaire, Paris

There was a hard, dark side to my family,’ begins the chef whose face is now synonymous with a smile. ‘[My father] was an introverted man, not at all expressive. He was orphaned and had been brought up by a strict and authoritative grandmother.’ Jean-Claude Gagnaire, an Apinac native, ran a one-starred restaurant in Saint-Étienne. […]

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Ubuntu, Napa

On 28th September 2006, Bill Clinton, addressing the Labour Party Conference, introduced the idea of ubuntu to the British public: ‘society is important because of ubuntu…If we were the most beautiful, the most intelligent, the most wealthy, the most powerful person – and then found all of a sudden that we were alone on the […]

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MR, Copenhagen

Once upon a time, Mads Refslund wanted to be a writer. As a child he enjoyed penning fantasy fiction pieces – short stories about princes, princesses and unicorns. However, having finished school, he decided to abandon books for another interest – cooking. Refslund had first begun dabbling with the culinary arts aged just eight. At […]

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Manresa (the return), Los Gatos

On Friday, Aaron and I had shared a remarkable meal at Manresa. On Saturday, we returned… Aperitif: Solter Brut Rheingau Riesling 2005. Tonight, we began with a light, well balanced Riesling. Soft and delicate, it had a pleasant sparkle. Amuse Bouche 1: Petit fours “red pepper-black olive”. Amuses at Manresa always remain the same. Second […]

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The Flemish Primitives, Bruges

During the fifteenth century, Bruges was an affluent centre of culture and sophistication. Residence to the dukes of Burgundy, a major trading hub, home to the Order of the Golden Fleece and the focus of Italian banking in the North, the town was plump with prosperous patrons looking to indulge their artistic impulses (and to […]

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Manresa, Los Gatos

René Redzepi, Alain Passard, Mauro Colagreco…this may appear to be a shortlist of world’s most exciting chefs, but their names also comprise a checklist of those who have recently made their way across the world, from Europe to little Los Gatos, to cook at one specific restaurant – David Kinch’s Manresa. Kinch first hit the […]

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noma – 6 years, 2 meals, 1 day

This will be a one-off post, a special entry – special to me anyway – as it concerns a special day, a special experience in every sense. For that reason, I shall abandon all the little rules, conventions and obsessive compulsions that have come to order my work. That means less script, more feeling and, […]

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In de Wulf, Dranouter – ‘Identity Crisis – Service à Six Mains’

  Half-an-hour across London. An hour-thirty on the Eurostar. Taxi from straight outside Gare de Lille Europe. ‘Dranouter, S’il vous plaît.’ ‘Où?’ il m’a demandé. ‘Dran-out-er, en Belgique à Heuvelland, quarante kilomètres d’ici,’ je lui ai dit. ’OK, je pense que je connais la direction. Pas de problème…’ One hour and ninety Euros later, having […]

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