foodsnobblog

noma – 6 years, 2 meals, 1 day

This will be a one-off post, a special entry – special to me anyway – as it concerns a special day, a special experience in every sense. For that reason, I shall abandon all the little rules, conventions and obsessive compulsions that have come to order my work. That means less script, more feeling and, […]

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In de Wulf, Dranouter – ‘Identity Crisis – Service à Six Mains’

  Half-an-hour across London. An hour-thirty on the Eurostar. Taxi from straight outside Gare de Lille Europe. ‘Dranouter, S’il vous plaît.’ ‘Où?’ il m’a demandé. ‘Dran-out-er, en Belgique à Heuvelland, quarante kilomètres d’ici,’ je lui ai dit. ’OK, je pense que je connais la direction. Pas de problème…’ One hour and ninety Euros later, having […]

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Coi, San Francisco

Events unforeseen and the United States government conspired to delay my arrival in the city by four hours. I had set aside sufficient time to unpack, undress, put on my suit and make it to Coi for an early dinner, but instead, I had to make my way straight from San Francisco International to the […]

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Maison Troisgros, Roanne

Once upon a time, it was the physical geography of a land that dictated the creation of settlements. Supplies of fresh water, flat land for farming, an easily defendable position – these were the factor’s that informed the decisions of early explorers. Examples abound: in England, London(ium) lay upon a busy river-crossing; in Turkey, Byzantium […]

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Sketch Lecture Room and Library, London

I first visited the Sketch Lecture Room almost two years ago. It was a different time. I was a different man. Since then, the economy has shrunk, whilst my admiration and enjoyment of good food has grown. Thus, in keeping with my own habitually contrarian nature, today I decided to dine at the most expensive […]

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Bras II, Laguiole

   Perhaps we were just lucky, possibly there had been a cancellation or non-arrival…or maybe it had been the expensive bottle of wine we ordered…whatever the reason, before we had finished our lunch, we were assured that a table would be ready for us at dinner.     For our second meal, we took the second […]

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Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester, London

I first dined with Ducasse almost a year ago to the day; it was less than one month after it initially opened, but already the knives were out. Another week, another victim / villain (delete as appropriate), n’est-ce pas? Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester, ADAD, was assumed to be another of the chef’s prestige restaurants, […]

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Bras, Laguiole

  Bras [se prononce Braz] – in Laguiole [se prononce læ-jol]. Michel Bras always found it too difficult to leave his native land of Aubrac. Born in Gabriac, he attended grammar school in Espalion before moving to Laguiole, where his parents ran a little restaurant – Lou Mazuc. He has remained there or thereabouts ever […]

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l‘Arpège, Paris

I heard a vicious rumour. At dinner recently, an American couple seated at an adjacent table, having engaged a friend and me in conversation, revealed that they used to eat at l’Arpège, but that was before the chef became a vegetarian. It was a shocking comment. We were aghast. In hindsight, however, such statements should […]

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The Sportsman, Seasalter

Great expectations. That is what we all had. That is also the title of Dickens’ novel of which some was set in or around where we would be lunching today. The we, well, that would be Aaron, half of A Life Worth Eating; Ulterior Epicure; an as yet, un-aliased and unaffiliated passive foodie (let’s call […]

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Maison Pic, Valence

  In the town of Valence, there was once a famous jurist called Jacques Cujas. He had an even more famous student, François Rabelais, who would go on to become the writer of note and notoriety from the Renaissance. Besides author, editor, friar, doctor, curate and lecturer, he was a lifelong cook and his works […]

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Noma, Copenhagen

   Noma = Nordisk + Mad = Nordic + Food. A simple name reveals a simple aim. There is a movement (for lack of a better term) in gastronomy towards a cuisine that is, above all, natural, but also generally fiercely local, seasonal and with a focus on superior ingredients. It is a style that […]

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Søllerød Kro, Copenhagen

Søllerød is a village on the northern cusp of Copenhagen. Although small, it boasts a serious history. Its medieval church dates back to 1100 AD whilst a number of its eighteenth and nineteenth century country-houses can claim to have once lodged illustrious local and international artists and poets alike – including the country’s most-loved, Hans […]

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Fäviken Magasinet, Järpen

‘Is it right that I force my customers to kill a chicken at their table before I cook it for their dinner?’ This was how Magnus Nilsson, flushed with excitement, accosted me one afternoon during February’s Omnivore food festival in Deauville. ‘A couple of Russian ladies just asked me this during an interview,’ he gushed. […]

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Victor’s Gourmet-Restaurant Schloss Berg, Perl-Nennig

In one of Germany’s most westerly corners, where France, Luxembourg and the federal republic collide, resides a Renaissance castle amidst the Mosel vineyards. Dating back originally to the twelfth century, Schloss berg in little Nennig, a village literally leaning against Luxembourg’s border, is more schloß than it is berg – the latter generally being medieval, […]

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