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Kitsune Udon (きつねうどん)

Named after the Japan­ese word for ‘fox’, kit­sune udon (きつねうどん) is a deli­cious dish made with thick udon noo­dles served in a dashi based soup stock with a large piece of abu­ra-age (油揚げ), deep fried thick-sliced tofu (thought to be the fox’s favorite food), or light­ly sweet and savory inari-age (稲荷揚げ), made by sim­mer­ing abu­ra-age […]

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Sweet and Sour Pork (咕嚕肉)

Sweet and Sour Pork (咕嚕肉) Nor­mal­ly, I’m not a fan of sweet and sour any­thing. The sauce in most restau­rants is a dis­turb­ing shade of day-glo red, and the veg­gies con­sist of giant hunks of onion, over­cooked pep­pers, and canned pineap­ple. How­ev­er, I decid­ed to give sweet and sour a sec­ond chance by mak­ing it []

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Shrimp with Lobster Sauce (蝦龍糊)

Shrimp with Lob­ster Sauce (蝦龍糊) Although you’ve prob­a­bly seen this dish on the menu at your local Chi­nese restau­rant, this is about as authen­tic to actu­al Chi­nese cui­sine as Mon­go­lian Beef or Gen­er­al Tso’s Chick­en (what’s gen­er­al­ly referred to in Chi­na as “Over­seas Chi­nese food”, or “Amer­i­can Chi­nese”). Even more con­fus­ing­ly, the sauce doesn’t actu­al­ly []

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Lobster Bisque

Lob­ster Bisque You can have your local supermarket’s seafood counter steam the lob­sters for you to save time. How­ev­er, don’t buy pre-picked lob­ster meat or frozen lob­ster- frozen lob­ster tends to be rub­bery and you will need the shells from whole lob­sters in order to make the stock. You can sub­sti­tute leeks in place of []

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Beef Chow Mein (牛肉炒面)

Beef Chow Mein (牛肉炒面) “Chow mein” (炒面) means “fried noo­dles”. This is an authen­tic recipe is for crispy chow mein, also known as Hong Kong style chow mein, and fea­tures fresh egg noo­dles, which are fried into a cake that soft­ens slight­ly when topped with a meat and veg­etable sauce. You can buy fresh chow []

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Gua Bao (割包)

Gua Bao (割包) Who knew? Chi­nese buns, or bao, are actu­al­ly easy to make at home!  ‘Gua Bao’ (割包, which lit­er­al­ly means ‘sliced-wrap­pers’) are a pop­u­lar snack (小吃) in Tai­wan and are said to have orig­i­nat­ed in Fuzhou. These sand­wich-style buns are prob­a­bly one of the eas­i­est Chi­nese buns to make in terms of shap­ing []

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Sweet Semolina and Dried-Apricot Pilaf

Sweet Semoli­na and Dried-Apri­cot Pilaf This love­ly dessert or late-break­fast dish is made by toast­ing coarse semoli­na and almonds in but­ter, then sim­mer­ing them with sweet­ened milk and dried apri­cots. The result is crumbly, aro­mat­ic and pilaf-like. It’s called hel­va in Turkey, though it’s not to be con­fused with anoth­er Turk­ish dessert called hal­vah, which []

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Tavuk Kebabi

Tavuk Kebabi (Mint and Alep­po Pep­per Mar­i­nat­ed Chick­en Kebabs) A thick, fla­vor­ful mari­nade of mint, Alep­po pep­per, and Turk­ish sweet red pep­per paste caramelizes on the out­side of these grilled chick­en kebabs. Ingre­di­ents: 1 cup olive oil 2 tbsp. dried mint 1 tbsp. crushed red chile flakes 1 tbsp. fine­ly chopped thyme 1 tbsp. Alep­po []

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Yeongeun-Jorim (연근조림) (Korean Sweet Soy Glazed Lotus Root)

Yeonge­un-Jorim (연근조림) (Kore­an Sweet Soy Glazed Lotus Root) Yeonge­un (연근, “lotus root”) jorim (조림, “reduced”) is a basic, every­day ban­chan (반찬) found at both home tables and restau­rants.  It’s a sim­ple dish of sliced lotus roots boiled then reduced in soy sauce and sug­ar or corn syrup.  Although this dish is often called “can­died lotus root” in Eng­lish, []

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Fried Green Beans

Fried Green Beans These are a great alter­na­tive to French fries, and have even been known to con­vert picky eaters and veg­etable haters. You can serve these with a dip­ping sauce (Ranch dress­ing or a remoulade sauce work well), but they’re tasty enough to eat on their own. Ingre­di­ents: 1 quart veg­etable oil for fry­ing []

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Peach Pie

Peach Pie Fresh peach­es make a per­fect sum­mer pie. You can peel the peach­es as they are, or blanch them in hot water for 30 to 40 sec­onds, then put them in a bowl of cold water to cool before peel­ing. Although I often use a lat­tice-top on my pie, you could also fin­ish your []

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Nabeyaki Udon (鍋焼きうどん)

Nabeya­ki Udon (鍋焼きうどん) Nabeya­ki udon is a kind nabe­mono (鍋物, なべ物), or hot pot dish, com­prised of seafood and veg­eta­bles cooked in a cast iron tet­sunabe (鉄鍋) or clay don­abe (土鍋). Typ­i­cal­ly, nabeya­ki udon has an egg and tem­pu­ra shrimp on top. Although the list of ingre­di­ents and the steps for mak­ing this dish seem []

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The Best Sweet Potato Pie

The Best Sweet Pota­to Pie  No bour­bon, crème fraîche, or any of the fan­cy add-ins here- just a solid­ly excel­lent, down-home sweet pota­to pie. What makes this no-frills recipe unique is the fine­ly-chopped pecans that are mixed into the crust and the fact that the sweet pota­toes are mashed by hand result­ing in a fill­ing []

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Blackberry Cobbler

Black­ber­ry Cob­bler You can use what­ev­er fresh berries or oth­er fruits that are in sea­son, but I like black­ber­ries the best for this clas­sic sum­mer cob­bler. Fill­ing: 4 cups fresh black­ber­ries 1⁄3 to 2⁄3 cup sug­ar 1 table­spoon corn­starch 1⁄4 cup water Make Fill­ing: Com­bine all ingre­di­ents in a saucepan, and cook over medi­um-high heat []

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